Volume 14 Supplement 1

2nd Clinical Trials Methodology Conference: Methodology Matters

Open Access

Recruitment to diagnosis of urinary tract infections in young children (DUTY) study: an evaluation of the successful methods used in a primary care, prospective cohort study

  • Cherry-Ann Waldron1,
  • Emma Thomas-Jones1,
  • Timothy Pickles1,
  • Kerry Hood1,
  • Kim Harman2,
  • Harriet Downing2,
  • Kate Martinson3,
  • Marilyn Peters4,
  • Alastair D Hay2 and
  • Christopher C Butler5
Trials201314(Suppl 1):P37

https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-14-S1-P37

Published: 29 November 2013

Introduction and aims

DUTY is a prospective cohort study to derive a clinical algorithm for diagnosis of urinary tract infections in acutely unwell children in primary care.

It provides an example of successful recruitment to a complex paediatric study, requiring the collection of a urine sample from young, unwell children. The aim is to describe and evaluate factors that contributed to its success from a study management and recruiter perspective.

Method

Four centres (Bristol, Cardiff, Southampton, London) coordinated recruitment from primary care sites across England and Wales. Two recruitment methods were available: 'Option 1' where research nurses supported, and 'Option 2' involving autonomous recruitment by NHS primary care team.

An evaluation of these methods and analysis of feedback questionnaires given to recruiting sites and research nurses involved in DUTY will be made.

Results

Out of 233 sites, 43% employed option 1 recruitment. 7163 children were recruited and 6390 (89%) urine samples were retrieved. (Bristol=2947 recruits, 92% retrieval rate, Cardiff=1768, 89%, London=1435, 84% and Southampton=1013, 90%).

Further analysis regarding option 1 and option 2 recruitment methods and feedback from recruiting sites and research nurses will be available for presentation in November 2013.

Conclusion

The success of DUTY to recruit above target is attributed to continuous availability of peer-support, adequate service support reimbursement, real-time data monitoring through web-based data entry, and the flexible offer of two recruitment methods. Feedback from recruiting sites and research nurses provides valuable insight into how recruitment in primary care can be optimised and improved in the future.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
South East Wales Trials Unit (SEWTU), School of Medicine, Cardiff University
(2)
Centre for Academic Primary Care, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol
(3)
Department of Primary Medical Care, University of Southampton
(4)
Division of Health and Social Care Research, Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London School of Medicine
(5)
Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University

Copyright

© Waldron et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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