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Table 1 Risk-reframing (RR) intervention content, behaviour-change technique (v1) and social cognitive theory construct

From: Go Play Outside! Effects of a risk-reframing tool on mothers’ tolerance for, and parenting practices associated with, children’s risky play: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

RR intervention tasks Behaviour-change techniquea Social cognitive theory construct
Home page
 Information and short video about risky play and why it is important, description of the tool components, logos of study partners
5.1 Information about health consequences
5.3 Information about social consequences
5.6 Information about emotional consequences
9.1 Credible source
• Outcome expectations
• Knowledge
Chapter 1: Reflection
 1. Selecting a child who will be the focus of the tasks
 2. Values and traits most desired for the child in adulthood
 3. Child’s favourite activities
 4. Participant’s own favourite childhood activities
 5. What the participant got out of these childhood activities
 6. How do her child’s activities compare to what the participant remembers doing at that age?
13.2 Framing/reframing
13.3 Incompatible beliefs
• Outcome expectations
• Knowledge
Chapter 2: What Would You Do?
 Participant is presented with three interactive video segments where she chooses to either allow or not allow the child to engage in the activity. Once the choice is made the rest of the video plays with the results of that choice. She can also see the results of the other choice, if she likes. The three scenarios involve:
 1. Climbing a tree
 2. Walking home from school
 3. Building a fort
1.2 Problem solving
5.1 Information about health consequences
5.3 Information about social and environmental consequences
5.6 Information about emotional consequences
6.1 Demonstration of behaviour
9.3 Comparative imagining of future outcomes
13.2 Framing/reframing
15.3 Focus on past successes
• Outcome expectations
• Knowledge
• Observational learning
• Barriers and opportunities
• Self-efficacy
 4. Common concerns: participant chooses from a list of fears that affect her in situations like the video scenarios (e.g. ‘ am concerned my child is going to get seriously hurt.’)
 5. Things that helped me let go: participant chooses from a list of things that helped her let her child keep going in situations like the video scenarios (e.g. ‘It is important to me that my child has opportunities to learn, build skills and try new challenges.’)
Chapter 3: Creating Your Plan
 1. Participant revisits the values and traits she wanted most for her child when they grow up, and is prompted to think about what she is doing to promote those things, and whether there is anything she wants to change
 2. Setting goals: participant is prompted to set one realistic and doable goal. Sample goals are provided
 3. Steps I would take to achieve my goal: participant is prompted to consider graduated steps to achieve the goal. Sample steps are provided
 4. I will begin my plan: participant sets a date for beginning her action plan
 5. Participant is invited to print out or email herself a PDF version of her plan
1.1 Goal setting (behaviour)
1.2 Problem solving
1.3 Goal setting (outcome)
1.4 Action planning
6.1 Demonstration of behaviour
7.1 Prompts/cues
8.7 Graded tasks
9.3 Comparative imagining of future outcomes
13.2 Framing/reframing
13.3 Incompatible beliefs
• Outcome expectations
• Knowledge
• Observational learning
• Barriers and opportunities
• Self-efficacy
• Behavioural skills
• Intentions
  1. aThe behaviour-change technique (BCT) numbers in this column correspond with numbering in Michie et al.’s BCT taxonomy [40]