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Table 3 Acute BiV pacing studies after cardiac surgery.

From: Temporary epicardial cardiac resynchronisation versus conventional right ventricular pacing after cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised control trial

Investigator Study title Sample Result
Pokushalov [20], 2010. CABG with CRT in patients with ischaemic heart failure and dyssynchrony. N = 178
EF ≤ 35%
QRS > 120
Reduced mortality with CRT, p = 0.006, reduced LOS and improved CI at 48 hours, p < 0.001.
Eberhardt [30], 2009. BiV pacing after CABG in patients with reduced LV function. N = 94
EF ≤ 40%
No significant difference between BiV and other pacing modes on haemodynamics or LOS.
Hanke [24], 2009. BiV pacing after cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with reduced LV function. N = 21
EF < 35%
QRS > 120
BiV superior to DDD(RV) pacing but not DDD(LV) or AAI pacing.
Evonich [31], 2008. Temporary BiV pacing in cardiac patients with severely reduced LV function. N = 40
EF ≤ 30%
No significant change in LOS or haemodynamic function with BiV.
Hamad [32], 2009. Acute haemodynamic effect of CRT in patients with poor LV function during surgery. N = 11
QRS > 130
EF ≤ 35%
Optimised (VV) BIV pacing improved haemodynamics (p = 0.03) v RV pacing.
Muehlschlegel [33], 2008. Temporary BiV pacing after CABG in patients with reduced ejection fraction. N = 10
EF < 50%
QRS > 120
Significant improvement in cardiac output with BiV v DDD(RV or LV).
Dzemali [34], 2008. Impact of different pacing modes on LV function following CABG. N = 80
EF ≤ 35%
Patients with dilated LV (mean 65 v 52mm) more likely to respond to BiV, p < 0.001.